EMDR & ACCELERATED
RESOLUTION THERAPY in utah

EMDR & ART

EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing) and Accelerated Resolution Therapy (ART) are two types of therapy that are used to treat trauma, anxiety, depression, and other mental health issues. These therapies involve the use of eye movements or other forms of bilateral stimulation to facilitate the processing of traumatic memories and emotions. During EMDR therapy, the therapist uses bilateral stimulation to guide the individual through a series of eye movements while they recall a traumatic event or disturbing memory. The eye movements are thought to detract from negative conceptualizations, and to activate the brain’s natural processing mechanisms, which helps to integrate and reprocess the traumatic memory in a more adaptive way. This can lead to a reduction in the emotional intensity and distress associated with the traumatic memory. Similarly, ART involves the use of eye movements or other forms of bilateral stimulation to help individuals process traumatic memories and emotions. ART also incorporates techniques from other forms of therapy, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy and exposure therapy, to help individuals develop coping skills and reduce the impact of negative thoughts and emotions. ART is non-verbal for parts of the session and

Healing the Brain & Body

EMDR and ART therapy can help heal not only the brain but the body as well, as they target the different areas where trauma can be stored. Trauma can be stored in various parts of the body, not just the brain. EMDR and ART therapy help to release these stored traumas, allowing the body to process them and release them.

During EMDR therapy, the bilateral stimulation used helps activate both hemispheres of the brain, which can help process traumatic memories and release them. This can have a significant impact on the body as well. Research has shown that trauma can manifest in the body through physical symptoms such as chronic pain, digestive issues, and other physical ailments. By processing the trauma through EMDR therapy, the body can release these physical symptoms and become more balanced.

Similarly, ART therapy helps to release stored trauma in the body through the use of eye movements and visualization techniques. By accessing the visual cortex of the brain, ART therapy can help reprogram the way the body stores trauma. This can result in a reduction of physical symptoms and an overall improvement in the body’s functioning.

Furthermore, both EMDR and ART therapy can help to regulate the nervous system. Trauma can cause the nervous system to become dysregulated, leading to symptoms such as anxiety, depression, and other mental health issues. By targeting the nervous system, both therapies can help to reduce these symptoms and improve overall mental health.

In addition to targeting the nervous system, both therapies can also help to improve brain functioning. Trauma can have a negative impact on brain functioning, leading to issues with memory, attention, and other cognitive processes. By processing the trauma through EMDR and ART therapy, the brain can become more balanced, resulting in improved cognitive functioning.

EMDR and ART therapy are effective at healing not only the brain but the body as well. By targeting the different areas where trauma can be stored, these therapies can help release the physical and emotional symptoms associated with trauma, leading to an overall improvement in mental and physical health.

WHAT IS EMDR AND ART THERAPY AND HOW DOES IT WORK?

EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing) and Accelerated Resolution Therapy (ART) are two types of therapy that have been developed to treat a range of mental health conditions, including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety, depression, and addiction. Both therapies use eye movements or other forms of bilateral stimulation to facilitate the processing of traumatic memories and emotions.

EMDR was developed by psychologist Francine Shapiro in the late 1980s. Shapiro discovered that by moving her eyes back and forth rapidly while thinking about a traumatic experience, she could reduce the intensity of the associated emotions. She went on to develop a structured therapy approach that involves the use of eye movements or other forms of bilateral stimulation, such as hand tapping or sounds, to help individuals process traumatic memories and emotions.

During an EMDR session, the therapist guides the individual through a series of eye movements while they recall a traumatic event or disturbing memory. The eye movements are thought to activate the brain’s natural processing mechanisms, which helps to integrate and reprocess the traumatic memory in a more adaptive way. This can lead to a reduction in the emotional intensity and distress associated with the traumatic memory.

The precise mechanisms by which EMDR works are not fully understood, but there are several theories. One theory suggests that the eye movements mimic the rapid eye movements that occur during the dream phase of sleep, which is thought to facilitate the processing of emotional memories. Another theory suggests that the eye movements help to stimulate both hemispheres of the brain, which promotes the integration of cognitive and emotional processes.

Research has shown that EMDR is an effective treatment for PTSD, and may also be effective for other mental health conditions, such as depression, anxiety, and phobias. EMDR is typically used in conjunction with other forms of therapy, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and exposure therapy, to help individuals develop coping skills and reduce the impact of negative thoughts and emotions.

Accelerated Resolution Therapy (ART) is a relatively new form of therapy that was developed in the early 2000s by clinical psychologist Laney Rosenzweig. ART also involves the use of eye movements or other forms of bilateral stimulation to help individuals process traumatic memories and emotions. However, ART incorporates techniques from other forms of therapy, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy and exposure therapy, to help individuals develop coping skills and reduce the impact of negative thoughts and emotions. The ART Therapist guides the client to replace the negative images in the mind that cause the symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress with positive images of the client’s choosing. Much of this is non-verbal, and it can lead to faster resolution of PTSD symptoms than some other forms of therapy.

During an ART session, the therapist guides the individual through a series of eye movements while they recall a traumatic event or disturbing memory. The eye movements are thought to facilitate the processing of the memory, while the therapist provides guidance and support to help the individual develop coping skills and reduce the impact of negative thoughts and emotions.

Research has shown that ART is an effective treatment for PTSD, depression, anxiety, and other mental health conditions. ART is typically used in conjunction with other forms of therapy, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy and mindfulness-based interventions, to help individuals develop coping skills and reduce the impact of negative thoughts and emotions.

The precise mechanisms by which ART works are not fully understood, but there are several theories. One theory suggests that the eye movements help to stimulate both hemispheres of the brain, which promotes the integration of cognitive and emotional processes. Studies have also suggested that both EMDR and ART can have a positive impact on the brain. For example, a study published in the Journal of EMDR Practice and Research found that EMDR can increase activity in the prefrontal cortex, a brain region involved in emotion regulation and cognitive control.

THE 8 PHASES OF EMDR

Using the detailed protocols and procedures learned during EMDR therapy training sessions, clinicians help clients activate their natural healing processes. EMDR therapy is an eight-phase treatment. Eye movements (or other bilateral stimulation) are used during one part of the session.

After the clinician and client have determined which memory to target first, the trauma therapist asks the client to hold different aspects of that event or thought in their mind and use their eyes to track the therapist’s hand as it moves back and forth across the client’s field of vision. This is believed to be connected with the biological mechanisms involved in Rapid Eye Movement (REM) sleep, which means internal associations arise and the clients begin to process the memory and disturbing feelings.

In successful EMDR trauma therapy, the meaning of painful events is transformed on an emotional level. Unlike traditional talk therapy, clients gain insight from their own accelerated intellectual and emotional process and not as much from clinician interpretation. The overall effect is that clients conclude the treatment feeling empowered by the very experiences that once debased them. As a natural outcome of the EMDR therapeutic process, the client’s healthier thoughts, feelings, and behavior are all indicators of emotional health and resolution.

We are specifically formulated to offer personalized therapeutic interventions to adult individuals with mental health disorders.

We provide a comprehensive Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP) that offers clients the opportunity to attend group therapy sessions three to five times a week.

We work with most major insurance policies

We get reimbursement for 85% of our clients *We don’t take Medicaid or Medicare

Our Recent Blogs

8 Phases of EMDR: A Comprehensive List

GETTING THE HELP YOU NEED AT CORNER CANYON

We do not accept Medicare or Medicaid.

We are a private pay program, and are out of network with most insurance companies. We have success securing single case agreements with many companies, however, the rate of payment on those varies with the insurance company and we cannot guarantee what they might pay. We will run a Verification of Benefits (VOB) when we receive your insurance information so you have a general idea of what your insurance policy may reimburse, however, that is an estimate based on what all people insured by your company have received from your insurance, not a guarantee of what they will pay in your case.

On average, Corner Canyon’s clients receive a portion of insurance reimbursement 85-90% of the time, but the amount varies from minimal repayment to full reimbursement. We have a team of insurance advocates who are invested in helping families secure as much reimbursement as possible.

Fill out our Online Application here or call us at 877-226-0317 and you will receive a return call, text, or email quickly, depending on what you specify. We want you to have the best experience possible with us from start to finish, and responsive communication is part of that.

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Liz Lund, MPA

Liz is originally from lush green Washington State. She is a life enthusiast and a huge fan of people. Liz has always loved learning why people are the way they are. She moved to UT in 2013 and completed her bachelors degree in Psychology in 2016. After college Liz worked at a residential treatment center and found that she was not only passionate about people, but also administration. Liz is recently finished her MPA in April 2022. Liz loves serving people and is excited and looking forward to learning about; and from our clients here at Corner Canyon.
When Liz is not busy working she love being outdoors, eating ice cream, taking naps, and spending time with her precious baby girl and sweet husband.